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1940 Studebaker

Studebaker Champion 1940

The success of the Champion in 1939 was imperative to Studebaker’s survival following weak sales during the 1938 model year. Unlike most other cars, the Champion was designed from a “clean sheet”, and had no restrictions caused by necessarily utilizing older parts or requiring the subsequent use of its components in heavier vehicles. Market research guided the selection of features, but a key principle adhered to was the engineering watchword “weight is the enemy.” For its size, it was one of the lightest cars of its era. Its compact straight-6 engine outlasted the model itself and was produced to the end of the 1964 model year, with a change to an OHV design in 1961.

The Champion was one of Studebaker’s best-selling models because of its low price (US$660 for the two-door business coupe in 1939), durable engine, and styling. The car’s ponton styling was authored by industrial designer Raymond Loewy who had been under contract with Studebaker for the design of their automobiles. Champions won Mobilgas economy runs by posting the highest gas mileage tests. During World War II, Champions were coveted for their high mileage at a time when gas was rationed in the United States. From 1943-1945, the Champion engine was used as the powerplant for the Studebaker M29 Weasel personnel and cargo carrier, which also used four sets of the Champion’s leaf springs arranged transversely for its bogie suspension.

The Champion was phased out in 1958 in preparation for the introduction of the 1959 Studebaker Lark. Prior to this, Studebaker had been placed under receivership, and the company was attempting to return to a profitable position.

1940 CHAMPION STUDEBAKER MAKES IT’S DEBUT


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Ford Introduces the 1958 Edsel

Edsel Sales Brochure

FORD – 1958 EDSEL RANGER – Introduction of the Edsel

Umm the announcer says it has a conservative design that will give it maximum appeal. We aren’t so sure! The Edsel never caught on with the public. Edsel is most notorious for being a marketing disaster. Indeed, the name “Edsel” became synonymous with the “real-life” commercial failure of the predicted “perfect” product or product idea. Similar ill-fated products have often been colloquially referred to as “Edsels”. The car was marketed as the new Ford’s mid-sized car answer to GM.

The Ford Edsel was a gas guzzler, incredibly ugly, and over priced according to Time Magazine’s article on “50 of the Worst Cars Ever Made”.
(Resource: http://content.time.com/time/specials/2007/article/0,28804,1658545_1657867_1657781,00.html)

Ford announced the end of the Edsel program on Thursday, November 19, 1959. However, production continued until late in November, with the final tally of 2,846 1960 models. Total Edsel sales were approximately 116,000, less than half the company’s projected break-even point. The company lost $350 million, or the equivalent of $2,831,563,927 in 2014 dollars, on the venture. Only 118,287 Edsels were built, including 7,440 produced in Ontario, Canada. By U.S. auto industry standards, these production figures were dismal, particularly when spread across a run of three model years.

Historians have advanced several theories in an effort to explain the Edsel’s failure. Popular culture often faults the car’s styling. Consumer Reports has alleged that poor workmanship was the Edsel’s chief problem. Marketing experts hold the Edsel up as a supreme example of the corporate culture’s failure to understand American consumers.

However, more than half a century after its spectacular failure, the Edsel has become a highly collectible item among vintage car hobbyists. Fewer than 10,000 Edsels survive and they are considered valuable collectors’ items. A mint-condition Edsel convertible from any of its three model years may sell for over $100,000.

1958 “live” commercial about the Edsel


Resource copyright information:
The above text and any photo images are from Wikipedia®. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of theWikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

Up From Clay – A Car is Born in 1959

A General Motors film that delves into how a car goes from a clay model to being mass produced. Here you can see a Fisher body being started. We see how designers and engineers take drawings turn them into clay mock ups and translate it into the tooling that will stamp steel and determine how all the steel, glass, rubber, fabrics and more will be turned into a brand new automobile. We also see how these cars are put through their paces on the test track.

bodiesbyfisher
The Stylist’s vision & design for a new car.

claymodel
The car is sculpted into a 3D model with clay.

over20000drawings
Over 20,000+ drawings to transform the stylist’s design into a plan for the prototype.

The Car that Runs on Air

A revolutionary car that runs on compressed air.

An amazing affordable auto that runs on air!

AIRPod is the culmination of MDI studies on pollution and urban mobility.
This concept will be the first to leave the production line in spring 2009. MDI will respond to an invitation to tender of the city of Paris, “Autolib'”, and is already the subject of applications for various municipalities.

With small size, a tiny price, zero pollution, fun and futuristic design, AIRPod mark a turning point in the range of urban vehicles while renewing the idea of the automobile and transportation. You can drive with a joystick, it only costs one euro per 200 km and leaves no one indifferent in crept in traffic.

It is a real breath of fresh air in our cities and the prelude to travel without pollution. Its small size make it easy to park, keeping still a large internal volume. AIRPod help us to forget the price of petrol.

AIRPod is part of the MDI production licence of “less than 500kg vehicles”, and is manufactured in the same factories as OneFlowAir, following the original production concept proposed by MDI.

AIRPod
The standard version is designed for the transport of persons. It has four seats (3 adults and one child) and has space for luggage. It is dedicated to multiple uses as in the private and public sectors. Airports, train stations and municipalities also need a cheap, non-polluting car with high mobility.

This wehicle is changing our urban life in the city center in freeing ourselves of the prohibitive cost of petrol and offering us mobility never gained until today.

AIRPod Cargo
This carriage version with a single place has a load volume greater than one meter cube that makes deliveries easy in town. Designed for runners, messaging, and the artisans and communities, Cargo AIRPod brings Zero Pollution in institutions. The Post, factory handling and delivery are markets of choice for AIRPod Cargo.

AIRPod Baby
Two front seats and a chest of more than 500 liters, all for less than 1,80m long, it’s the most extreme, a real challenge for car design. This model was created keeping in mind the most congested cities by traffic. It is a versatile which can also be used for deliveries, municipal services, roads and small logistics.